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All Australians want for Christmas is… ‘money’ & ‘quality time with family’

Source: Roy Morgan Australian Online survey conducted December 12-17, 2019. n=1,028 Australians aged 18+.
A special Christmas survey conducted over the past few days shows there’s nothing Australians want more for Christmas than some cash in the stocking. 12% of Australians mentioned some kind of financial windfall as what they most want for Christmas while 10% were just after a good time with their family and friends.

Other popular desires were wrapped up in the latest electronic gadgets and computer games (9%), a relaxing holiday (8%), clothing and accessories (8%) or household or garden items (8%).

Many Australians don’t even want anything you can measure asking for world peace and economic prosperity (6%), happiness (5%), good health (5%), time off work (3%) or political or environmental goals of one sort or another (2%).

Women after quality time with family & friends while men want a holiday for Christmas

Both women and men are attracted to a financial bonanza but women are more likely to opt for quality time with family and friends (12%), clothing and accessories (10%) and household or garden items (9%).

In contrast men are more likely to prioritise electronic gadgets and computer games (10%) and a good holiday (9%) than women.

What do women and men want for Christmas?

Source: Roy Morgan Australian Online survey conducted December 12-17, 2019. n=1,028 Australians aged 18+.

What do Australians of different ages want for Christmas?

Australians of different ages are all after something different with younger Australians aged 18-24 hanging out for clothing and accessories (17%), money (16%), or a good holiday (15%) while their slightly older peers aged 25-34 give money top spot (15%) on the preference scale ahead of electronic gadgets and computer games (14%).

Australians aged 35-49 have the travel bug and want a holiday (10%) or money (10%) more than anything else, but many would settle for quality time with family and friends (8%).

Older Australians aged 50+ aren’t that interested in tangible gifts - 15% nominate quality time with family and friends, 11% are after money and 10% would like world peace & economic prosperity for all. 

What do Australians of different ages want for Christmas?

Source: Roy Morgan Australian Online survey conducted December 12-17, 2019. n=1,028 Australians aged 18+.

Michele Levine, Chief Executive Officer, Roy Morgan, says Christmas means different strokes for different folks, and there is no clearer example of that than when we ask Australians what they really want:

“It should come as no surprise that the main gift Australians want to find under the Christmas tree when it comes time to unwrap presents is a financial windfall of some sort. Aussies of both genders are after cold hard cash, or perhaps a lottery win, to make their Christmas Day a winner.

“These sentiments aren’t reflected evenly across age groups though. Younger Australians would prefer some new threads or accessories to show off and Australians of child rearing age longing for a relaxing holiday to an exotic location, or perhaps just a trip down the coast for a few days.

“Older Australians aren’t after a tangible Christmas gift – except for those after their share of the ‘not so filthy lucre’ – preferring intangible and nebulous desires such as quality time with loved ones, a world at peace, or economic nirvana for the populations of earth.

“Clearly Christmas comes in all sorts of boxes, feelings, emotions and emoticons and what while the perfect gift for grandma might be a hug and a kiss on the cheek, junior is more likely to be eyeing off the latest trendy hoodie Ben Simmons is luxuriating in with Kendall.”

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About Roy Morgan

Roy Morgan is the largest independent Australian research company, with offices throughout Australia, as well as in Indonesia, the United States and the United Kingdom. A full service research organisation specialising in omnibus and syndicated data, Roy Morgan has over 70 years’ experience in collecting objective, independent information on consumers.

Margin of Error

The margin of error to be allowed for in any estimate depends mainly on the number of interviews on which it is based. Margin of error gives indications of the likely range within which estimates would be 95% likely to fall, expressed as the number of percentage points above or below the actual estimate. Allowance for design effects (such as stratification and weighting) should be made as appropriate.

Sample Size

Percentage Estimate

40%-60%

25% or 75%

10% or 90%

5% or 95%

5,000

±1.4

±1.2

±0.8

±0.6

7,500

±1.1

±1.0

±0.7

±0.5

10,000

±1.0

±0.9

±0.6

±0.4

20,000

±0.7

±0.6

±0.4

±0.3

50,000

±0.4

±0.4

±0.3

±0.2